Deport without 'judges or court cases'

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"We can not allow all of these people to invade our Country", Trump said on Sunday on Twitter while in a motorcade headed to his golf course in Virginia.

"When somebody comes in, we must immediately, with no Judges or Court Cases, bring them back from where they came", said Trump, suggesting they be handled without the due legal process guaranteed for "any person" by the US Constitution.

Trump's tweets on Sunday came after a week of global outcry over images and video of crying children and their distraught parents separated at the U.S. -Mexico border.

Trump wrote that the US immigration system is "laughed at all over the world", and is "very unfair" to those who use legal avenues to gain entry. "Immigration must be based on merit - we need people who will help to Make America Great Again!"

Representative Luis Gutierrez, a Democrat from IL, said today that the president's choice of words was being used to gin up his supporters for the mid-terms.

The statement added that children are given the opportunity to communicate with a "vetted" parent or relative within 24 hours of arriving at an HHS-funded facility, but advocates and an organization providing foster care for separated children have told NBC News it can take weeks for parents to be tracked down and able to communicate with their children by phone.

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Trump once again railed against US immigration laws, calling them a "mockery" to law and order in his tweetstorm.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., visiting a processing center for undocumented immigrants on the Texas border, dismissed the implication that the migrants should be denied due process. He said during a campaign appearance Saturday in Las Vegas that being for "strong borders, no crime" is a winning issue for Republicans to run on in November's congressional elections.

Democrats and other opponents of the administration's policy say that court case is not the root of the problem, noting that separating families was the exception, not the rule, for most of the two decades since the Flores case was resolved. "I don't want judges, I want border patrol, I want ICE". Mr. Trump last week signed an executive order aimed at ending the separations, but his aides are struggling to carry it out, and to reunite the separated families.

"I'm a 'no, '" said Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., a member of the hard-right House Freedom Caucus.

"Rather than encouraging people to vote for it, (Trump) gave them a reason not to vote for it by saying 'What's the point of having the vote if the Senate isn't going to pass it?'" he said.

Late Saturday night, a DHS statement said 522 children out of more than 2,500 had already been reunited since the policy began.

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