GOP set for showdown immigration vote

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Despite a last-minute endorsement from President Donald Trump, the House on Wednesday roundly rejected a comprehensive Republican immigration bill that would have funded a border wall and sought to keep migrant families together despite prosecution.

Ryan said the broader bill would resolve the issue of young adults who were brought to the United States illegally as children; focus on a merit-based immigration system; and secure US borders and the rule of law.

Bryan Renbaum of Talk Media News reports the lower chamber defeated the measure 301-121. The House Republican caucus did a faceplant on the issue in a vote this week, failing to muster much more than half of the votes necessary to pass its "compromise" attempt at broad immigration reform.

Andrew Roberts, the campaign manager of Love's Democratic opponent in November, Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams, said the congresswoman failed to deliver.

Trump has demanded that Congress resolve the family separations with legislation, amid an uproar at home and overseas over the separation of more than 2,300 children from their parents that resulted from his administration's policy of "zero tolerance" toward illegal immigration.

Trump tweeted in capital letters Wednesday: "HOUSE REPUBLICANS SHOULD PASS THE STRONG BUT FAIR IMMIGRATION BILL, KNOWN AS GOODLATTE II, IN THEIR AFTERNOON VOTE TODAY, EVEN THOUGH THE DEMS WON'T LET IT PASS IN THE SENATE".

House Republicans abandoned a GOP leadership-backed immigration bill Wednesday, the latest setback in the years-long intraparty war between Republicans on the polarizing issue. Some GOP lawmakers had become nervous about backing the package for fear that he might change his mind again, putting them on the wrong side of Trump backers.

The bill would end "excessive regulatory burdens" - such as requiring employers to provide housing and transportation for migrant workers, according to a summary of the bill by Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee. "Unfortunately, many who voted against the bill ... were more concerned with politics than people and policy", Love said in a statement. Two Republicans did not cast votes on Wednesday.

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Since Trump initiated his “zero tolerance” policy of detaining everyone who enters the USA illegally, more than 2,000 immigrant children have been separated from their parents.

Trump's support for the failed bill had wavered dramatically over the past several weeks - from the President appearing to criticize it on Fox News to personally pitching the legislation during an in-person meeting on Capitol Hill to his announcement just days later that Republicans should wait until after the midterms to address immigration.

As such, and through a purely Irish reform lens, neither bill would have met the criteria necessary to be dubbed a true comprehensive immigration reform measure. When pressed on whether he would support alternatives to family detention, such as expanding the use of ankle monitors among immigrants released from federal custody, Ryan didn't directly answer, and accused Democrats of supporting lax border security.

After the rejection of the bill, Trump offered a message to Republican lawmakers.

Faced with both domestic and global outrage, Trump last week signed an executive order to halt the family separation practice, but made no specific provisions for those already split apart.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Tuesday he would like to see the Senate unanimously passed legislation to prevent family separations.

More: Did the Obama administration separate families? Lawmakers view that as a temporary solution and want to vote on the subject to showcase that they're taking action.

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