It's showtime as Trump announces high court nominee Monday

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The 53-year-old Cavanaugh is now a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, and previously served under President George W. Bush's administration as staff secretary to the office of the president.

In his dissent for Seven-Sky v. Holder, Kavanaugh detailed how he views the role federal courts should play, one that includes no oversight over Congress's taxation powers. And that's good - the court is important, Democrats haven't focused on it like Republicans have, and Trump's hype machine finally has them paying the amount of attention they should. For lawmakers who are not on the Judiciary Committee, it may be their only chance to talk with the nominee personally before a final vote. While Supreme Court justices tend to respect precedents set by previous courts, such as 1973's Roe v. Wade decision, the new court could seriously curtail some rights without fully overturning them.

But his supporters note his experience and a wide range of legal opinions.

Trump kept the suspense running through the weekend, teasing the announcement for maximum dramatic effect, but by Monday afternoon was reported to have made his pick among a shortlist of four judges, all with solid right-wing credentials.

They are Brett Kavanaugh, a former adviser to George W. Bush; Raymond Kethledge, a strict interpreter of the US Constitution; Amy Coney Barrett, a devout Catholic and social conservative; and Thomas Hardiman, a staunch gun rights advocate. "I think we would certainly see an end to any further progression of the expansion of those rights". "I look forward to meeting Judge Kavanaugh and hope for a fair confirmation process", Roberts said. The Supreme Court nominee argued in the past that President Bill Clinton could have been impeached for lying to and misleading both his staff and the public at large. They have to defend 10 seats in red states and try to pick up two additional seats in order to take control of the Senate. Though Kennedy is a conservative, he was often a swing vote on big decisions, such as same-sex marriage, abortion and affirmative action. Joe Donnelly, West Virginia Sen.

Barrett - a longtime Notre Dame Law School professor who became a federal appeals judge last fall - excited social conservatives with her testimony when questioned about her Roman Catholic faith in her nomination hearings past year.

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The senators have stayed mum on whether they're planning to support Trump's nominee, saying they'll wait until after he announces to weigh in.

The leading Republican to replace Sen.

While the president has been pondering his choice, his aides have been preparing for what is expected to be a tough confirmation fight. Republicans hold a 51-seat majority in the Senate, which would be sufficient to put him on the high court if all GOP senators support him. He works for the Washington-based lobbying firm Covington & Burling. "Thirty years ago, President Reagan nominated Anthony Kennedy to the supreme court".

The nominee is expected to meet in coming days with senators at their offices, going door-to-door in get-to-know-you sessions ahead of confirmation hearings.

Casey said he opposes the process by which Trump is picking his judges, which he described as choosing from a list of 25 nominees prepared by conservative organizations such as the Heritage Foundation and the Federalist Society.

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