Leahy: Trump's Supreme Court Pick 'More Than Frightening'

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President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, mapped out strategy with Republican leaders Tuesday, launching a fierce confirmation battle that could remake the court for decades and roil the midterm elections in the meantime.

Mr Trump called it an "honour and privilege" to nominate Judge Kavanaugh, who became a judge for the US Court of Appeals in 2006, and said he had "impeccable credentials and unsurpassed qualifications". She served with the Pennsylvania-based Hardiman on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit.

He also worked for Kenneth Starr, the independent counsel who investigated then president Bill Clinton but in 2009 he was reported as saying that presidents should be free from civil lawsuits, criminal prosecutions and investigations while in office.

"Well, it's still - let's say it's the four people".

Given Kavanaugh's conservative bent, many Democrats are up in arms about the future of Obamacare should the judge be confirmed.

Compared to some of Trump's other options, Kavanaugh is "more of a moderate conservative", McDaniel said: he is a textualist and originalist, but also says he would adhere to precedent.

Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer vowed an all-out battle against Kavanaugh, but senators in his party can not block Kavanaugh's confirmation if no Republicans break ranks.

In a 2009 article for the Minnesota Law Review, Kavanaugh argued that the president should be exempt from "time-consuming and distracting" lawsuits and investigations, which he said would "cripple the federal government, rendering it unable to function with credibility in either the worldwide or domestic arenas".

"We have a president whose statements and policies are rooted in racism".

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The reaction of her constituents in ME to Kavanaugh's nomination has been "very mixed", she said.

The case said that religious employers did not have to provide contraceptives but had to file a form telling the government they were not doing so, but Kavanaugh argued that the requirement violated religious freedom.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., made a promise of his own, telling "CBS This Morning" that he will work to oppose the nomination with "everything I've got", adding that he's confident there will be a majority in the Senate that will do the same. They already have also been hammering the message that he would vote to undermine key progressive priorities like the landmark Roe v. Wade decision on abortion rights and the Supreme Court decision affirming the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act.

Kavanaugh still lives in the D.C. area, raising his kids in the Maryland suburbs just miles from the White House.

"I believe it is vital that the President be able to focus on his never-ending tasks with as few distractions as possible", Kavanaugh wrote.

The Democrats are trying to pressure two Republicans, Sens.

Among their targets are Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Joe Manchin of West Virginia, as well as Doug Jones of Alabama, who is not up for re-election but represents a conservative state in the Deep South. Schumer said at a press conference outside the supreme court on Tuesday.

The conservative Kavanaugh is looking to take over a spot set to be vacated by Justice Anthony Kennedy's abrupt impending retirement. Fox News was a close second to CBS past year when Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch in a similar prime-time show, but that was on a winter night when many CBS viewers were probably anticipating a new episode of "NCIS".

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