Trump riled after unions head accuses him of hurting USA workers

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"Unfortunately, to date, the things that he has done to hurt workers outpace what he's done to help workers", Trumka told Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday.

"Congress should not interfere with these negotiations or I will simply terminate NAFTA entirely & we will be far better off".

"Today the president notified the Congress of his intent to sign a trade agreement with Mexico - and Canada, if it is willing - 90 days from now", Lighthizer said in a statement Friday.

"We were far better off before NAFTA".

Talks between the two countries ended without an agreement on Friday as negotiators failed to reach an agreement to include Canada in the deal before notice was sent to Congress.

The negotiations to rewrite it dragged on for a year and Canada stayed on the sidelines this summer while the USA and Mexico executed the hard bargaining.

The Toronto Star proclaims them "secret bombshell remarks": off-the-record comments President Trump made about Canada in an interview with Bloomberg News on Thursday that were leaked to the Star.

He warned that unless the new deal is a trilateral one, it won't get congressional backing or the support of the business community.

Gorka noted Canada has a almost 300-percent tariff on US dairy imports, while the European Union taxes USA vehicle imports at a rate approximately four times higher than the USA tax on European-made cars.

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Speaking on Fox News on Friday, Trumka acknowledged the initial agreement included some improvements over the status quo but also argued "it's pretty hard to see how that would work without having Canada in the deal". He was involved in tough negotiations for the Canada-U.S.

The administration had constructive talks with Canada this week and is still hopeful the nation will join the deal with the USA and Mexico, a senior administration official told reporters Friday.

The 24-year-old NAFTA tore down most trade barriers dividing the United States, Mexico and Canada.

He urged the crowd to not let Trump or anyone else divide Americans based on race, religion, nationality or sexual orientation. The White House set a deadline for Friday because it wanted to notify Congress in time for Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto to sign the accord before his successor, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, takes office on December 1.

In follow-up tweets, the president hailed economic growth, adding: "The Worker in America is doing better than ever before!"

And as they prepare to resume negotiations Wednesday, they say they are optimistic. Ottawa does have other complaints.

But Daniel Ujczo, a trade attorney of the law firm Dickinson Wright in Columbus, Ohio, and others say the flashpoints include trade barriers that protect Canadian dairy farmers and Ottawa's insistence on keeping NAFTA provisions for resolving disputes.

When the Trump administration notified Congress past year that it meant to renegotiate NAFTA, critics note that it said it would enter talks with both Canada and Mexico. And it's considering slapping tariffs of up to 25 percent on an additional $200 billion in Chinese imports after a public comment period ends Thursday.

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