As Florence Surges Forward, Rethinking What Hurricane Preparation Looks Like

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A search-and-rescue team is being deployed by FEMA from Montgomery County in Maryland to help in SC as the area braces for Hurricane Florence.

The National Hurricane Center's latest model for Hurricane Florence shows a similar track that has been reported throughout Wednesday.

The hurricane center, in its 5 a.m. Thursday update, said Florence was 205 miles east-southeast of Wilmington, N.C., moving northwest at 15 mph.

The slow movement, combined with the massive amount of moisture this storm holds, will bring unsafe rains - from 20 to 30 inches in coastal North Carolina and 40 inches possible in isolated areas, the weather service says.

With South Carolina's beach towns more in the bull's-eye because of the shifting forecast, OH vacationers Chris and Nicole Roland put off their departure from North Myrtle Beach to get the maximum amount of time on the sand.

More than a million people have been ordered to evacuate the coastline of the three states, while schools and factories were being shuttered.

Hurricane conditions are likely to hit the area around North Carolina's southern coast on Thursday night and Friday, but tropical storm conditions will arrive on earlier Thursday, according to the hurricane center.

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Liberty Mutual Insurance and Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company write the most commercial property insurance coverage in North and SC, according to a report on Wednesday by Moody's, citing data from SNL Financial.

Florence's winds in the afternoon were down slightly to 125 miles per hour (205 kph), from a high of 140 miles per hour, and the Category 4 storm fell to a Category 3.

While some of the computer forecasting models conflicted, the latest projections more or less showed the storm shifting southward and westward in a way that suddenly put more of SC in danger and imperiled Georgia, too. "Now it might be time for the exam", Baxley said late in the morning.

NOAA Hurricane Hunters have been flying constantly from Lakeland Linder International Airport, right into Hurricane Florence.

And if that isn't enough, Subtropical Storm Joyce formed in the North Atlantic Tuesday afternoon, but it's not expected to hit the U.S. The system is expected to drift to the southwest in the coming days.

Massive waves of up to 83 feet were measured inside the storm on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center's Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch said, citing satellite altimeter data. Life-threatening, catastrophic flash flooding and river flooding is likely. Forecasters also were tracking two other disturbances. "It goes well inland".

"This is going to be a Mike Tyson punch to the Carolina coast", said Jeff Byard, the associate administrator for response and recovery at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). We continue to let everyone know to not take this lightly.

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