Virat Kohli, Rohit Sharma shatter Sachin Tendulkar records in Guwahati

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Despite chasing a huge 323, skipper Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma made the first ODI a lop-sided contest.

During their knocks, the two broke plenty of records.

There is awe and wonder every time Virat Kohli makes a century in a chase, simply because of how often he does it and often because of how simply he does it.

Rohit has also scored three double-centuries in ODIs, the most by any batsman in history.

India chased down the 323-run target easily thanks to captain Virat Kohli and Rohit's hundreds, with 47 balls to spare. "That's my basic thinking, because you are playing for India and not everyone gets to do that", Virat Kohli was quoted as saying at the post-match press conference. "It was one of those days where I felt good and I told Rohit I will continue to bat this way positively and maybe you can play the anchor role", he added.

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In reply, India lost opener Shikhar Dhawan in just the second over of the innings after he was bowled by debutant fast bowler Oshane Thomas. And when I got out, he took over and [Ambati] Rayudu played the anchor.

He received the ODI cap from MS Dhoni but could not get an opportunity to bat and was rather sloppy in the field, which is quite understandable considering he is a wicket-keeper.

West Indies captain Jason Holder conceded that his team fell 30-40 runs short.

The ton was his 14th as India's ODI captain, edging him closer to Ricky Ponting's record 22 as Australian skipper. "They are two legends and when they are playing like this, it sometimes feels like they are playing PS4", said the leg-spinner. Up front we went to get wickets as that was the only way to put them under pressure. "Obviously on a track like this that's skidding on when the lights take effect, it becomes a little more hard", Holder explained. It is a cruel irony for long-term Indian fans - who finally have more than one Tendulkar-like player and a win-loss ratio comparable to the Australian teams of the 2000s - that they still have to invest a fair amount of their times into faith and prayers.

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