Lion Air Crash: Boeing points global warning for incorrect jet sensors

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Exhibiting similar problems, a recently delivered Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 passenger plane crashed into the Java Sea off Jakarta, Indonesia, nearly two weeks ago with 189 people aboard.

Indonesian authorities extended on Wednesday a search for victims of the plane crash last week, when all 189 on board a Lion Air flight were killed, and for the aircraft's second black box, the cockpit voice recorder.

Indonesian investigators said the sensor was replaced on the Lion Air plane the day before its fatal flight and may have compounded other problems with the aircraft.

The sensor keeps track of the angle of the aircraft nose relative to oncoming air to prevent the plane from stalling and diving. It could lead to "excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss, and possible impact with the terrain", it... Investigators have stated that Lion Air pilots were battling with the plane's computer system as it suddenly sent the aircraft into a steep dive.

This emergency AD was prompted by analysis performed by the manufacturer showing that if an erroneously high single angle of attack (AOA) sensor input is received by the flight control system, there is a potential for repeated nose-down trim commands of the horizontal stabilizer.

The acting administrator of the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Dan Elwell, said the FAA and NTSB had teams of experts in Indonesia at the government's request.

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On that flight, from Bali to Jakarta, the two sensors disagreed.

Southwest had 23 737 Max 8 in its fleet as of September 30, with nine more to be delivered by the end of the year.

Another Lion Air flight has crashed just a week after one of the company's planes plunged into the sea, killing 189 people. Boeing has more than 4,500 orders for the airliners, which feature larger engines, more aerodynamic wing and an upgraded cockpit with larger glass displays.

The Lion Air crash was the first involving the type of plane, which airlines introduced into service a year ago. It stressed that pilots should follow procedures in the flight manual when encountering erroneous data.

The angle-of-attack sensor is meant to measure the angle between air flow and a reference line on the frame or wings so that they maintain lift.

He said during a flight from Bali to Jakarta on October 28, the sensor of the plane's AOA of the plane had appeared erroneous - the left and right AOA sensors were found to disagree by about 20 degrees. If pilots aren't careful, they can cause severe nose-down trim settings that make it impossible to level a plane. United Technologies supplies the angle-of-attack sensors and indicator for the 737 Max, according to Airframers.net.

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